Jump to content
 

supra

Verified Members
  • Content Count

    2
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About supra

  • Rank
    Contributor

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. To quote my post from above... ------------------- $10/hr for 1,000 points * 8hrs of operation per day* 30 days of operation per month = $2,400 With a 50/50 split, $1,200 goes to the developer and $1,200 goes to HTC. That seems off by orders of magnitude. I'm not aware of any developers that charge $1,200/month ($14,400) per year for a commercal license. Space Pirate Trainer commercial license is only $30/month. And that's for 24 hours a day. At HTC rates, 24 hours per day * $10 / hr * 30 days a month = $7200. Viveport is charging 240 times what a single SPT license costs. I'm not sure having a variety of games is worth a 240x increase. You could buy 240 individual licenses for different games at that price, for a single station. Even at the $5 promotional pricing, it's a 120x increase.
  2. Echoing 's questions -- to run a quick scenario playing a game 'full time'... $10/hr for 1,000 points * 8hrs of operation per day* 30 days of operation per month = $2,400 With a 50/50 split, $1,200 goes to the developer and $1,200 goes to HTC. That seems off by orders of magnitude. I'm not aware of any developers that charge $1,200/month ($14,400) per year for a commercal license. Space Pirate Trainer commercial license is only $30/month. And that's for 24 hours a day. At $1 for 1,000 points the SPT folks would be making $120 for an 4X increase in their profits. HTC would get $120 of the $240 per month for that seat. At $0.25 for 1,000 points SPT takes home the $30 they're expecting -- with HTC taking $30 of the $60 per month for providing the Viveport Arcade service. Given the massively increased reach of potential commerical licensees, it would make sense for developers to hop on board. At sub $1 per 1,000 point prices, an arcade operator can make money while keeping prices low for visitors -- charging perhaps $5-15/hr depending on the location of the arcade or kinds of permium services provided around the experience. Arcades will compete on features and the users will win. Retail space, payroll, utilities, advertising, etc are real fixed costs to consider, as well as less than full time utilization due to the ebb and flow of available visitors, especially in smaller markets. There are also significant startup costs and risks facing operators. At $10 per 1,000 points, it doesn't seem at all viable without a co-located, tertiary, likely non-VR service or product as the primary profit driver. If you've got to sell liquor or something just to get by then that's a lot of additional time and money and limits the total audience. It would be awesome to see physical spaces flourish - in particular, I think that a lot of multiplayer and social experiences would benefit from having groups of real life friends coming in and playing in groups. The extra-low latency of being in the same place and on hte same network is also a huge advantage for certain kinds of experiences. Are the prices correct? Could you please clarify? Thanks in advance for your time and help!
×
×
  • Create New...